statute of limitations

Today’s blog entry deals with the question of what happens when you have an individual with a progressive disability who becomes aware of inaccessibility of a public entity’s facilities. When he becomes aware of inaccessibility issues by the public entity, he files suit but then withdraws it because the accessibility issues are not a problem

Happy new year everybody. Hope everybody enjoyed their holiday and is now raring to get back to work. Just to give everybody a heads up, the week of January 28 and February 3 may not see a blog entry for me at all. During those two weeks, I will be testifying in two different trials

It is time for my annual greatest hits blog entries of the year. Before getting to the greatest hits blog entries of the year, a few blog entries are so important that they make it every year regardless of where they fit in the greatest rankings. Those blog entries are: ADA compliance in higher education,

This is a situation I see all the time. Let’s say you are at a university. A student goes to disability services, gets an accommodation plan, even gives it to the teacher. The teacher resists. The student may or may not try to fix it until later in the semester figuring that something will develop.

Before getting started on the blog entry of the week, next week is the Jewish new year. I want to take the opportunity to wish all of my Jewish brethren a happy and healthy new year for them and their families. It also means that no one should be surprise if the blog entry for

It is time for the top 10 plus three of 2017. For the most part, the greatest hits, but not of all of their order of popularity stayed the same from 2016 to 2017, except for one entry (negligence per se dropped out of the top 10 and was replaced by the history of ADA