I hope everyone is getting back into the swing of the new year. Next week, I will be visiting my daughter in between January term and second semester. I will be here Monday but leave Tuesday and back Friday. So, I am not sure of the timing of the blog entry for next week. This

Today’s blog entry come from the Supreme Court of Maryland in a case called In the Matter of Antavis Chavis, here. The case, a 4-3 decision in favor of the plaintiff, should have high-stakes testing entities, and even colleges, and universities reevaluating the documentation they demand before deciding to make accommodations/modifications for an individual

I hope those that celebrated had a happy Hanukkah. Merry Christmas, happy new year, and happy holidays to everyone.

Today’s blog entry is my top 11 or so for the year. As is my past practice, I have included important blog entries that do not make the list . Most of those though were

I hope everyone had a Fourth of July weekend that was fantastic and safe.

Our blog entry for the week is a case that we have blogged on before. It asks the question of whether a claim of morbid obesity requires an underlying physical impairment or mental impairment or is just the claim of

Before getting started on the blog entry of the day, I do want to wish everyone celebrating, a happy Passover and a happy Easter. Also, major league baseball has started, so good luck to any of your teams.

Turning to the blog entry of the day, one wonders why anyone in the state of

Hockey, Ice Hockey, Puck, Hockey Stick

Picture of Hockey helmet, puck, and stick (brown and black colors).

As readers know, I have long been interested in the intersection of the ADA and sports. Many of my blog entries cover that topic. The very first edition of Understanding the ADA back in 2000 had a whole chapter on it. The subsequent

Today’s blog entry is my yearly wrap up of the most popular blog entries for 2022. As I always do, there are some additional blog entries that I keep in the greatest hits category due to what I believe is their significance even though they may not be the most popular. With respect to the

Previously, such as here, I have written about how Batson/Edmonson challenges could be used with respect to people with disabilities not being allowed to serve on juries. The interesting thing about Batson and its civil equivalents is that whenever I have asked litigators if they have encountered the situation of using Batson to prevent

Today’s blog entry deals with the question of whether the interactive process continues through any litigation and whether evidence of that interactive process taking place or not taking place when the case is being litigated can be brought into evidence. The case is Kovachich v. Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, here, decided