Hockey, Ice Hockey, Puck, Hockey Stick

Picture of Hockey helmet, puck, and stick (brown and black colors).

As readers know, I have long been interested in the intersection of the ADA and sports. Many of my blog entries cover that topic. The very first edition of Understanding the ADA back in 2000 had a whole chapter on it. The subsequent

Today’s blog entry is my yearly wrap up of the most popular blog entries for 2022. As I always do, there are some additional blog entries that I keep in the greatest hits category due to what I believe is their significance even though they may not be the most popular. With respect to the

Previously, such as here, I have written about how Batson/Edmonson challenges could be used with respect to people with disabilities not being allowed to serve on juries. The interesting thing about Batson and its civil equivalents is that whenever I have asked litigators if they have encountered the situation of using Batson to prevent

Today’s blog entry deals with the question of whether the interactive process continues through any litigation and whether evidence of that interactive process taking place or not taking place when the case is being litigated can be brought into evidence. The case is Kovachich v. Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, here, decided

I had already gone through two drafts of putting this blog entry together when I saw that the United States Supreme Court came down with it decision in Cummings (we discussed the oral argument here). One thing Cummings shows me is that predicting the Supreme Court result from the oral argument is a fools

Today’s blog entry is a discussion of two related cases. The comes from the first case comes out of the 11th Circuit. It is Behr v. Campbell, here, and it discusses the Rooker-Feldman doctrine. That decision is a published decision decided on August 12, 2021. The second decision is Lund v. Cowan,

Today’s blog entry discusses the real issue of whether ADA serial plaintiffs, architectural or Internet, and ADA testers will continue to have standing with respect to claims filed in federal court. The case of the day actually has nothing to do with disability discrimination, but in a sense it has everything to do with disability