Hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving weekend.

Before getting started on the case of the day, I wanted to let everyone know that I have updated two blog entries in the Understanding the ADA blog. First, last week’s blog entry discussing how people in California who associate with a person with a disability have

Previously, such as here, I have written about how Batson/Edmonson challenges could be used with respect to people with disabilities not being allowed to serve on juries. The interesting thing about Batson and its civil equivalents is that whenever I have asked litigators if they have encountered the situation of using Batson to prevent

In numerous blog entries, we have talked about how magic words are not required. We have also talked about staying away from requests for excessive documentation. The question is how do the two work together. A published decision from the 11th Circuit decided on November 9, 2022, Owens v. State Of Georgia, Gov.’s Office

Today’s blog entry deals with two decisions from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit dealing with essentially the same fact pattern. One decision, Williams v. MTA Bus Company, here, is a published decision decided August 12, 2022, while the other decision, Frilando v. New York City Transit Authority is a summary

I was alerted to today’s case, Bledsoe v. Tennessee Valley Authority Board of Directors, a published decision from the Sixth Circuit decided on July 27, 2022, by Jon Hyman, the person behind the Ohio Employers’ Law Blog, who blogged on the case here. As is often the case, I don’t mind blogging on

Today’s blog entry deals with the question of whether the interactive process continues through any litigation and whether evidence of that interactive process taking place or not taking place when the case is being litigated can be brought into evidence. The case is Kovachich v. Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, here, decided

Today’s blog entry come from the First Circuit, Laufer v. Acheson Hotels, LLC, here. It discusses standing and creates a split in the circuits. Undoubtedly, this issue will go before the Supreme Court. The facts of the case are pretty straightforward. What you have is a serial plaintiff and an avowed tester of Internet

Before getting started on the blog entry of the week, I want to wish the members of the Jewish faith celebrating Yom Kippur this week a pleasant fast if you are fasting’s as well as a pleasant end to the 10 days of reflection.

Also, I wanted to report that my case against LawPracticeCLE

Before getting started on the blog entry for the week, I want to wish all those celebrating, a happy Jewish new year.

The blog entry of the week comes from an unpublished decision from the 11th Circuit decided on September 19, 2022, Sugg v. City of Sunrise. It deals with the following