I hope everyone had a happy holiday weekend. In many places around the world, today is also a holiday as it is Easter Monday.

On April 7, 2023, the Seventh Circuit came down with a decision discussing the de minimis rule when it comes to accommodating an employee’s religious needs. I got to thinking

Today’s blog entry is a case from the Eastern District of New York, Martinez v. Gutsy LLC, here, which makes the case for why standalone websites can be a place of public accommodation providing that site is functioning for one of the purposes laid out in 42 U.S.C. §12181(7).

Once again, a person

In numerous blog entries, we have talked about how magic words are not required. We have also talked about staying away from requests for excessive documentation. The question is how do the two work together. A published decision from the 11th Circuit decided on November 9, 2022, Owens v. State Of Georgia, Gov.’s Office

Today’s blog entry discusses two different concepts. The first concept it discusses is what just does “transitory and minor,” mean for purposes of the regarded as exception and for purposes of what I mean when I keep talking about it as a great preventive law approach to deciding when a temporary disability might be protected

Today’s blog entry deals with the question of what happens when you have an individual with a progressive disability who becomes aware of inaccessibility of a public entity’s facilities. When he becomes aware of inaccessibility issues by the public entity, he files suit but then withdraws it because the accessibility issues are not a problem