Previously, I mentioned that the upcoming Supreme Court term will have two cases before it pertaining to the rights of people with disabilities. One of those cases asks the question of whether disparate impact claims exist under §504 of the Rehabilitation Act. On August 24, 2021, the Ninth Circuit over a dissent said that such

Synagogue, Jewish, 1869, Pecs, Hungary

Synagogue (two story)

Previously, I blogged on a Seventh Circuit case discussing whether the ministerial exception applied to hostile work environment situation. In that panel decision, the Seventh Circuit said that the ministerial exception did not apply to situations involving a hostile work environment. You can see the complete discussion of that panel decision

Today’s case explores the arguments as to why an adverse action is not necessary in failure to accommodate cases. As a bonus, it also explores how workers compensation exclusivity does not preempt a state’s disability antidiscrimination law. The case of the day is Richter v. Oakland Board of Education decided on June 8, 2021, by

Hope everyone had a great Memorial Day holiday weekend. Today’s blog entry talks about the latest update from the EEOC with respect to Covid-19. All the labor and employment law bloggers are blogging on it, so I decided to blog on it as well and offer my own perspective. As with previous blog entries of

Today’s blog entry deals with the question of what happens when an employer demands that an employee move to a different job without evaluating or completely assessing whether that employee is capable of performing his or her current job’s essential functions with or without reasonable accommodations. The answer to the question says the Fourth Circuit