Previously, I mentioned that the upcoming Supreme Court term will have two cases before it pertaining to the rights of people with disabilities. One of those cases asks the question of whether disparate impact claims exist under §504 of the Rehabilitation Act. On August 24, 2021, the Ninth Circuit over a dissent said that such

Today’s blog entry is a discussion of two related cases. The comes from the first case comes out of the 11th Circuit. It is Behr v. Campbell, here, and it discusses the Rooker-Feldman doctrine. That decision is a published decision decided on August 12, 2021. The second decision is Lund v. Cowan,

Synagogue, Jewish, 1869, Pecs, Hungary

Synagogue (two story)

Previously, I blogged on a Seventh Circuit case discussing whether the ministerial exception applied to hostile work environment situation. In that panel decision, the Seventh Circuit said that the ministerial exception did not apply to situations involving a hostile work environment. You can see the complete discussion of that panel decision

Today’s blog entry discusses the real issue of whether ADA serial plaintiffs, architectural or Internet, and ADA testers will continue to have standing with respect to claims filed in federal court. The case of the day actually has nothing to do with disability discrimination, but in a sense it has everything to do with disability

Today’s blog entry is an update on a prior blog entry where I discussed a District Court of New Hampshire decision saying that legislative immunity trumps everything, including the ADA. That case got appealed to the First Circuit. I was very flattered to learn that my blog entry discussing the decision holding that legislative immunity

Colonel Johnny (my hearing dog while I practice virtually).

Today’s blog entry explores the following situation. A defendant was charged with multiple counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse. The victim, R.L., of that abuse suffered posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as a result. She testified at trial with a service dog. The

We now have a new Associate Justice on the United States Supreme Court, Amy Coney Barrett. For those interested in how she might rule on disability rights matters, see this blog entry1821206969198. Today’s blog entry came to me from my involvement with the Federal Bar Association civil rights section. Caryl  Oberman, a Pennsylvania attorney