failure to accommodate

Today’s blog entry is one of those situations where I read a case and asked myself whether the court could have gotten to the same place more elegantly than the way it did. The case of the day is Bruno v. Chasity Wells-Armstrong, here, decided by the Seventh Circuit on February 23, 2024. As

I hope those that celebrated had a happy Hanukkah. Merry Christmas, happy new year, and happy holidays to everyone.

Today’s blog entry is my top 11 or so for the year. As is my past practice, I have included important blog entries that do not make the list . Most of those though were

An emerging issue is whether when it comes to accommodating a person with a disability in an employment situation, are you accommodating the disability or are you accommodating the essential functions of the job. The easy scenario where that matters is when dealing with an employee with a service dog. Recently, Hobby Lobby was sued

What if an entity slow walks the reasonable accommodation process with the hope that the person with the disability will, for example, graduate, age out of the program, simply go away? Is an unreasonable delay in granting a reasonable accommodation actionable under the ADA? Two cases out of the jurisdiction of the Seventh Circuit say

Today’s case explores the arguments as to why an adverse action is not necessary in failure to accommodate cases. As a bonus, it also explores how workers compensation exclusivity does not preempt a state’s disability antidiscrimination law. The case of the day is Richter v. Oakland Board of Education decided on June 8, 2021, by