Before getting started on the blog entry for the week, breaking news today. The Supreme Court agreed to hear a case involving tester standing involving serial plaintiff Deborah Laufer. We discussed the case here in a blog entry that correctly predicted that the Supreme Court would hear the case. Now if only my predictive abilities

To start the new year, we are going to have a short discussion of a couple of cases dealing with attorney fees in the serial plaintiff context. Then, we are going to explore the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act that was just signed by Pres. Biden as part of the massive bill to keep the government

Today’s blog entry is my yearly wrap up of the most popular blog entries for 2022. As I always do, there are some additional blog entries that I keep in the greatest hits category due to what I believe is their significance even though they may not be the most popular. With respect to the

Hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving weekend.

Before getting started on the case of the day, I wanted to let everyone know that I have updated two blog entries in the Understanding the ADA blog. First, last week’s blog entry discussing how people in California who associate with a person with a disability have

In numerous blog entries, we have talked about how magic words are not required. We have also talked about staying away from requests for excessive documentation. The question is how do the two work together. A published decision from the 11th Circuit decided on November 9, 2022, Owens v. State Of Georgia, Gov.’s Office

Today’s blog entry deals with two decisions from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit dealing with essentially the same fact pattern. One decision, Williams v. MTA Bus Company, here, is a published decision decided August 12, 2022, while the other decision, Frilando v. New York City Transit Authority is a summary